Archive for the ‘Dividend Income’ Category.

2017-11 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for November, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $560.60. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $5699.20.

The income for November, 2016 was $506.98, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of November was $5048.77.

I am in the process of selling most of my stocks and putting my money in ETFs, with an emphasis on dividend growth ETFs. I plan on writing more about this in the future.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each November from 2011 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-11 $5699.20 $560.60 $559.31 $560.58
2016-11 $5048.77 $506.98 $502.98 $500.27
2015-11 $4517.55 $460.83 $477.55 $452.28
2014-11 $3528.16 $291.27 $357.30 $343.53
2013-11 $2811.61 $252.75 $277.74 $291.48
2012-11 $2898.91 $247.99 $262.78 $284.49
2011-11 $2577.05 $246.37 $232.84 $240.81

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for November, 2017:

  • AT&T: $53.95
  • Verizon: $64.58
  • WGL Holdings Inc: $18.31
  • ABM Industries Inc: $9.95
  • Lowe’s Cos Inc: $22.96
  • Air Products & Chemicals Inc: $64.92
  • Clorox Co: $50.16
  • Texas Instruments: $68.84
  • Colgate-Palmolive: $46.00
  • Hormel Foods Corp: $16.94
  • Northwest Natural Gas Co: $30.04
  • Procter & Gamble: $43.02
  • Eaton Corporation: $70.93

“Crucible of Creation”  taken by the Hubble Telescope and released by NASA on November 20th, 1995. Image from Hubble Site, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-10 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for October, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $341.83. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $5138.63.

The income for October, 2016 was $281.09, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of October was $4541.79.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

I might sell Kellogg. They were below my cost basis, and I was thinking they might not be profitable for some time. I do invest in stocks for the cash flow and not capital gains, but that does not mean I want to take a loss. If a firm cuts its dividend and the price has dropped, then I still lose money.

I had thought that getting into a food stock would be good since everybody needs to eat. However, that does not seem to be working out. Both Kellogg and General Mills have not increased their revenue and/or profits by a whole lot over the past few years. Even Coke is having problems keeping revenue growing, and they have Warren Buffett on their speed dial. Kellogg did get a boost in earnings from a weaker dollar. But I don’t know if I should count on that in the future. An article on Bloomberg about this had a quote from Ken Shea, an analyst at Bloomberg Intelligence: “They’re really tripling down on cost cuts, which tells me they know the top line is not going to turn in their favor any time soon.” It reminds me of a quote from Starbucks founder Howard Schultz: “Cutting prices or putting things on sale is not sustainable business strategy. The other side of it is that you can’t cut enough costs to save your way to prosperity.”

Berkshire Hathaway was behind the merger of Kraft and Heinz, and from what I have read KraftHeinz is also relying on cost cuts to make a profit. Maybe food is not a good industry to be in. There is also a lot of churn in the agricultural trading industry. I hope that my investment in ADM will work out. I might wait a while before buying Bunge.

On a side note, Glencore tried to buy Bunge a while back. Part of the pitch to investors is that doing so would break up the “ABCD” quartet of ADM, Bunge Ltd., Cargill Inc. and Louis Dreyfus. But is “AGCD” any better than “ABCD”? Or is reducing the quartet to a trio any better?

One reason that I was looking to invest in food is that I thought that people would pay for something they need. It turns out they will, but people want low prices for things they need. Many people will pay a lot of money for things they want, like electronics. Or things they want but have convinced themselves they need, like iPhones.

On the other hand, water stocks seem to be doing pretty well.

WRT energy, I did see an article on Bloomberg’s site about Exxon’s research and investment into green energy. Hopefully they are sincerely looking into it, and not backing smaller companies to buy their technologies and take them out of the market.

I am also looking at insurance. It seems like a no-brainer: a financial product people need. But I wonder how climate change is going to affect insurance. Berkshire Hathaway‘s insurance divisions lost money due to natural disasters. Travelers and Munich Re were also negatively affected by natural disasters.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each October from 2011 through 2017:

 

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-10 $5138.63 $341.83 $566.34 $556.11
2016-10 $4541.79 $281.09 $508.05 $496.43
2015-10 $4056.72 $312.23 $459.42 $438.15
2014-10 $3236.89 $243.87 $368.19 $340.32
2013-10 $2558.86 $184.81 $295.19 $291.08
2012-10 $2650.92 $225.14 $285.46 $284.35
2011-10 $2330.68 $208.90 $258.17 $238.44

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for October, 2017:

  • Automatic Data Processing: $35.28
  • Coca-Cola Co: $51.28
  • MDU Resources Group Inc.: $11.81
  • Kimberly-Clark: $59.11
  • Illinois Tool Works: $44.60
  • Leggett & Platt, Incorporated: $54.73
  • Chubb Corp: $45.86
  • Sysco Corp: $20.03
  • RPM International Inc.: $19.13

“Edge of a Wheatfield with Poppies” (1887) by Vincent van Gogh (March 30, 1853-July 29, 1890), assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-09 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for September, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $775.50. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $4796.80.

The income for September, 2016 was $720.86, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of September was $4260.70.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

It looks like Exxon might get back to where it was a few months ago. I think eventually oil companies will either become more diverse energy companies or go out of business. Some of them are doing research into other forms of energy and/or funding other companies. They have gone back and forth on this a few times. I think eventually they will need to stick with funding/backing other forms of energy. Some are really backing offshore wind.

I can’t find it now, but I read an article about this energy transition (I think it was on Bloomberg) in which an executive at Royal Dutch Shell pointed out that the reason the Shell Oil Company is called the Shell Oil Company is because they started out in the 19th century importing sea shells into the UK. I guess people liked having shells in their living rooms. But shells have nothing to do with oil, and the founders were not named “Shell”, so it is kind of an odd name for an oil company. He said they survived the 20th century by becoming an oil company, and if they want to make it throught the 21st, they will have to do something in addition to and/or in place of being an oil company. So there is a transition going on.

If you are a startup fanboy who thinks that big companies never do anything right and small companies are never wrong (and always useful), you can pretend all of this is not happening if it makes you feel better.

I will have to look more into what Chevron and Exxon are doing.

Also on my to-do list: Look at water utilities and insurance companies. It would be nice if there were fit women who found this sort of thing exciting.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each September from 2011 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-09 $4796.80 $775.50 $562.76 $551.05
2016-09 $4260.70 $720.86 $505.47 $499.02
2015-09 $3744.49 $659.59 $443.06 $432.46
2014-09 $2993.02 $536.75 $353.04 $335.39
2013-09 $2374.05 $395.65 $293.78 $294.44
2012-09 $2425.78 $315.21 $283.66 $283.00
2011-09 $2121.78 $243.26 $256.81 $233.01

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for September, 2017:

  • AFLAC Inc: $48.07
  • American States Water Co: $29.79
  • Black Hills Corp: $17.01
  • Bemis Co Inc: $32.40
  • Vectren Corp: $26.28
  • Aqua America: $35.00
  • Archer-Daniels-Midland Co: $39.28
  • Honeywell International: $68.66
  • Sonoco Products Co: $53.38
  • Chevron: $27.77
  • Emerson Electric Co: $53.30
  • Exxon Mobil Corp: $93.42
  • Johnson & Johnson: $88.91
  • 3M Co: $16.67
  • Walgreen Co: $23.92
  • Dover Corp: $11.40
  • Consolidated Edison Inc: $22.95
  • Kellogg Company: $59.25
  • RLI Corp: $28.04

Image of Spell For Not Letting Ani’s Heart Create Opposition Against Him from the Egyptian Book of the Dead, available at Wikipedia, assumed allowed under Fair Use (it dates from 1550 BCE, so I assume it’s public domain). The image may not be relevant to the contents.

 

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2017-08 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for August, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $581.69. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $4021.30.

The income for August, 2016 was $522.20, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of August was $3539.84.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

I might buy some ETFs. USAA might make some new ones, I might check those out.

I have thought about selling ExxonMobil. I think that oil companies will probably go down in value. I think they will definitely have fewer employees in a few years. I am still above my cost basis. It has gone up because of Hurricane Harvey. Usually hurricanes wipe out investments. Now one is helping bail me out. A hurricane is keeping my Exxon shares afloat.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each July from 2011 through 2017:

 

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-08 $4021.30 $581.69 $558.23 $546.50
2016-08 $3539.84 $522.20 $493.44 $493.92
2015-08 $3084.90 $406.45 $427.26 $422.22
2014-08 $2456.27 $323.94 $348.41 $323.64
2013-08 $1978.40 $305.11 $279.05 $287.74
2012-08 $2110.57 $316.04 $280.53 $277.00
2011-08 $1878.52 $322.35 $254.56 $225.45

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for August, 2017:

  • AT&T: $53.28
  • Verizon: $62.45
  • WGL Holdings Inc: $18.20
  • Clorox Co: $49.85
  • ABM Industries Inc: $9.92
  • Vodafone: $40.13
  • Lowe’s Cos Inc: $22.84
  • Air Products & Chemicals Inc: $64.50
  • Texas Instruments: $55.18
  • Colgate-Palmolive: $45.75
  • Hormel Foods Corp: $16.85
  • Northwest Natural Gas Co: $29.67
  • Procter & Gamble: $42.70
  • Eaton Corporation: $70.37

Portrait of the dogs playing poker by Cassius Marcellus Coolidge (September 18, 1844 – January 24, 1934), available at Wikipedia, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-07 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for July, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $331.08. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $3439.61.

The income for July, 2016 was $273.36, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of July was $3017.64.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each July from 2011 through 2017:

 

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-07 $3439.61 $331.08 $541.56 $541.54
2016-07 $3017.64 $273.36 $464.99 $484.27
2015-07 $2678.45 $263.13 $412.44 $415.35
2014-07 $2132.33 $198.43 $333.77 $322.07
2013-07 $1673.29 $180.57 $258.23 $288.65
2012-07 $1794.53 $219.72 $261.24 $277.53
2011-07 $1556.17 $204.83 $235.96 $211.69

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for July, 2017:

Automatic Data Processing: $35.08
Coca-Cola Co: $50.87
MDU Resources Group Inc.: $11.72
Kimberly-Clark: $58.67
Illinois Tool Works: $37.00
Leggett & Platt, Incorporated: $54.36
Chubb Corp: $45.64
Sysco Corp: $19.91
RPM International Inc.: $17.83

 “Le Simoon” by Eugène Fromentin (October 24, 1820 – August 27, 1876), available at Wikimedia, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-06 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for June, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $761.91. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $3108.53.

The income for June, 2016 was $684.76, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of June was $2744.28.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

One stock I am thinking about buying is Wal-Mart.

One theory going around is that the only reason retail is struggling is because of Amazon. But I think there are other factors as well.

Retail has always been a low margin business. The Great Recession caused people to consume less, and for a lot of people, consumption has not returned to pre-recession levels. So, yes, Amazon is getting a big slice of the pie, but the pie has gotten smaller (or at least is not growing as quickly).

The people who do have money are spending more on travel and food. Plus, despite the dip from the GR, the USA still has more retail space per capita than other countries. Any industry will have a hard time dealing with overcapacity.

Although Amazon is buying Whole Foods (and Wal-Mart is a big player in the grocery space), that might not threaten Wal-Mart as much as people think. WalMart not same clientele as Whole Foods, and when times get tough, people try to spend less money (see this page).

Plus a lot of retailers are owned by private equity firms who only know “financial engineering”, but not how to actually run a business (see this article on Naked Capitalism; also see some of the articles linked to in the preamble). If a big chunk of an industry gets the “strip and flip” model, there will be a lot of casualties. One thing PE firms do is split a retail firm and its real estate into separate entities, then charge the retail firm rent for the land it used to own, increasing its costs. As one commenter pointed out, is retail shrinking because Amazon is expanding, or is Amazon expanding because retail is shrinking?

The point is, I don’t think the story behind the troubles in the retail sector is as simple as “Amazon”.

One counter to the “Amazon eats the world” story is that Wal-Mart is trying to adapt. Walmart is working on e-commerce, and that part of their business is growing (see this page and this page).  Wal-Mart has closed some stores. That is pretty huge in my opinion. For a long time, they thought the answer to all their problems was to just open more stores. And for a long time, it worked.

I think Wal-Mart is taking Amazon very seriously. Wal-Mart is trying to prevent some vendors from running apps on AWS (see this page). Moments ago the fecal matter departed the imaginary realm.

On the other hand, you still see articles like this: Wal-Mart Asks Employees to Deliver Packages on Their Way Home. So to a certain degree, it is the same old Wal-Mart. Stay classy, Bentonville.

Amazon going after everything (see this page and this page). If you look at oil, utilities, it has looked like a lot of dividend industries might be going through a lot of change. Amazon is targeting a lot of them. How are will they go? Who knows. But I think that once Bezos steps away from Amazon, any potential threat will diminish.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each June from 2011 through 2017:

 

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-06 $3108.53 $761.91 $539.42 $536.73
2016-06 $2744.28 $684.76 $464.00 $483.42
2015-06 $2415.32 $612.21 $411.83 $409.95
2014-06 $1933.90 $522.86 $333.10 $320.58
2013-06 $1492.72 $351.48 $257.79 $291.91
2012-06 $1574.81 $305.84 $260.85 $276.29
2011-06 $1351.34 $236.50 $235.38 $203.23

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for June, 2017:

  • AFLAC Inc: $47.73
  • American States Water Co: $28.12
  • Black Hills Corp: $16.90
  • Bemis Co Inc: $32.18
  • Vectren Corp: $26.10
  • Aqua America: $32.52
  • Archer-Daniels-Midland Co: $38.98
  • Emerson Electric Co: $52.86
  • Honeywell International: $68.31
  • Sonoco Products Co: $52.98
  • Exxon Mobil Corp: $92.54
  • Chevron: $27.48
  • 3M Co: $16.58
  • Walgreen Co: $22.32
  • Johnson & Johnson: $88.34
  • Dover Corp: $10.61
  • Consolidated Edison Inc: $22.77
  • Kellogg Company: $56.66
  • RLI Corp: $27.93

“The Coin Collector” by Joos van Craesbeeck (c. 1605/06 – c. 1660), available at Moo Of I site, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-05 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for May, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $531.68. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $2346.62.

The income for May, 2016 was $436.85, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of May was $2059.52.

There is not a whole lot to report this month. Just rolling along and making money.

I did get a WGL payment. I think there will be three more before the acquisition by AltaGas is complete.

I know that last month I said it was not an argument against DGI that WGL was being bought out. A counter might be that after the buyout, I will no longer be getting that money from WGL. That is true. But that also is not an argument against DGI in my opinion.

Generally, nobody acquires a company that is not profitable. I know I am always saying price is not as important to DG investors as it is to other investors, and that is true, but that does not mean I am against taking a capital gain when I have to. I spent $974 on WGL when I first bought it. When I got the payout from WGL on May 1, my shares were worth $2,942.17, for a gain of $1967.77, which I can then use to buy another DG stock.

And as to why I would take a capital gain “when I have to”, my goal is to buy DGI stocks and use them as an income stream for years, ideally for the rest of my life. Buying low to sell high sounds nice, but does not always work. It tends to stop working when people need it to work the most, like the dot com bubble or the meltdown during the Great Recession. People tend to need a higher price the most when they are least likely to get it. Then they truly understand free markets. I don’t care if you paid $80/share for a stock that is now selling at $40/share. Why should I pay you $80 when everybody else is selling at $40? I don’t care if you owe the bank $350K on your mortgage and you put a deck on your house and redid your bathroom. If all the houses in your area are going for $300K, that’s what you’re getting. End of story.

We saw a lot of stocks go down in price during those two meltdowns yet still increase their dividends. DGI performs better in a crisis than the capital gains/buy-low-sell-high model that most people go by. It might not always work, but the last two times things fell aprt it worked better. Past performance may not guarantee future results, but I would rather rely on patterns than dreams.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each May from 2011 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-05 $2346.62 $531.68 $553.90 $530.30
2016-05 $2059.52 $436.85 $479.79 $477.37
2015-05 $1803.11 $361.99 $411.92 $402.51
2014-05 $1411.19 $280.01 $304.77 $306.30
2013-05 $1141.24 $242.65 $260.91 $288.11
2012-05 $1268.97 $258.15 $257.13 $270.51
2011-05 $1114.84 $266.55 $233.03 $194.61

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for May, 2017:

  • ABM Industries Inc: $9.88
  • AT&T: $52.64
  • Verizon: $61.70
  • WGL Holdings Inc: $18.09
  • Clorox Co: $47.19
  • Air Products & Chemicals Inc: $64.07
  • Lowe’s Cos Inc: $19.42
  • Colgate-Palmolive: $45.49
  • Hormel Foods Corp: $16.77
  • Northwest Natural Gas Co: $29.43
  • Procter & Gamble: $42.36
  • Texas Instruments: $54.84
  • Eaton Corporation: $69.80

“Where There Are People Money May Be Made” by Adriaen van de Venne (1589 – 1662), available here, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-04 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for April, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $324.66. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $1814.94.

The income for April, 2016 was $270.38, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of April was $1622.67.

I got my first payout from Leggett and Platt (LEG), which I think more than makes up for the income I lost since Duke bought Piedmont Natural Gas.

I found out that WGL Holdings (WGL), a “B” month stock, decided to be acquired. Rather, the board decided to pursue a merger with Canadian company AltaGas. I got this packet in the mail asking me to vote on it. I found out that if the merger does not go through, WGL will have to pay a breakup fee to AltaGas of $136 million. Perhaps the board should have asked shareholders to vote on whether to agree to a merger in the first place. WGL would have to pay a fee even if AltaGas breaks off the merger under most circumstances; there are some in which AltaGas would have to pay WGL amounts ranging from $68 million to $205 million.

Granted, if it goes through, I lose a dividend stock that gives me money. But I get some cash to buy another stock. Should I go with another gas utility? I have already had two bought out from under me (Piedmont and Questar). An article in Forbes points out that low interest rates and growing use of natural gas in the USA has fueled a lot of mergers in the past few years. There is more to the hype than just a lot of hot air; this sector is really cooking.

I might add a few gas utilities to my watch list: ATO, SJI, SRE, SWX. Another reason to add another gas utility is that NWN,  another gas utility I own, has had declining revenue for a while. These other utilities are doing better on that measure.

So I will probably have at least one fewer stock soon. That kind of stinks, but as I wrote I can use the cash to buy something else. Sometimes DGI detractors (or stock detractors in general) will say something like, “While X companies that fit this criteria twenty years ago, only Y still do. Some of those companies do not exist anymore.” You hear this from people in the startup world who like to bash corporations. I don’t think that a company being acquired (or even going private) is necessarily a bad thing, or that it invalidates the DGI or corporate models. WGL isn’t going bankrupt. Being acquired or going private is not a sign of failure for a large corporation, any more than being acquired would be a sign of failure for a startup. Is Instagram a failure because they were bought by Facebook? Pivoting, on the other hand, could mean you were just flat out wrong to begin with.

No dividend growth investor who knows what they are doing thinks dividends are guaranteed forever. But the probability that a firm that has paid dividends will continue to do so is pretty high. It is better than hoping to get a good price when you need it. Dividends tend to mostly go up, while price is more volatile. Even Bogle knows this.

(An announced dividend payment IS guaranteed, and legally binding.)

Also: do not interpret all of this to mean that corporations are always right; think of Monsanto suing farmers, tobacco companies spreading disinformation about cancer, oil companies spreading disinformation about climate change, etc.

Interesting fact: the word “disinformation” actually comes from Russian. Coincidence? I think not.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each April from 2011 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-04 $1814.94 $324.66 $532.02 $522.40
2016-04 $1622.67 $270.38 $461.86 $471.14
2015-04 $1441.12 $261.30 $409.21 $395.68
2014-04 $1130.58 $196.43 $323.64 $303.18
2013-04 $898.59 $179.23 $262.82 $289.40
2012-04 $1010.82 $218.56 $274.05 $271.21
2011-04 $848.29 $203.10 $216.30 $179.46

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for April, 2017:

  • Automatic Data Processing: $34.89
  • Coca-Cola Co: $50.43
  • MDU Resources Group Inc.: $11.64
  • Kimberly-Clark: $58.24
  • Illinois Tool Works: $36.82
  • Leggett & Platt, Incorporated: $51.00
  • Chubb Corp: $44.13
  • RPM International Inc.: $17.73
  • Sysco Corp: $19.78

Portrait of Élisabeth Charlotte d’Orléans (1676 – 744) by an unknown artist, assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-03 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for March, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $805.35. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $1490.28.

The income for March, 2016 was $732.13, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of March was $1352.29.

In February I bought Aqua America, which pays in “C” months, but I did not buy it in time for the March payout.

I am thinking about decreasing my oil stocks (or even getting rid of them altogether) and getting more water utilities. Right now the yields in water utilities is kind of low, but I think long term it is a better bet than oil companies. I think we will be using oil for a while, but the past few years have been a wild ride for oil companies, and I don’t think things will calm down anytime soon. There seems to be a lot going on in a lot of industries that have a lot of dividend payers: Utilities, banks, railroad companies. I wonder if the dividend revival that we have seen in the past decade will last the next downturn.

I have been thinking about putting some of the money I have in a taxable account into some ETFs. I am thinking about buying shares in a real estate ETF, even though a lot of people say real estate is also overvalued. Granted, I think people have been calling everything overvalued for about five years now. Maybe it’s time to just bite the bullet.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each March from 2012 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-03 $1490.28 $805.35 $496.76 $517.88
2016-03 $1352.29 $732.13 $450.76 $470.38
2015-03 $1179.82 $612.48 $393.27 $390.27
2014-03 $934.15 $437.87 $311.38 $301.75
2013-03 $719.36 $360.85 $239.79 $292.68
2012-03 $792.26 $294.68 $264.09 $269.92
2011-03 $645.19 $229.43 $200.06 $163.15

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for March, 2017:

  • AFLAC Inc: $47.45
  • American States Water Co: $27.98
  • Black Hills Corp: $16.78
  • Bemis Co Inc: $31.99
  • Vectren Corp: $25.91
  • Valspar Corp: $22.25
  • Chevron: $27.22
  • Emerson Electric Co: $52.45
  • Honeywell International: $67.97
  • Sonoco Products Co: $49.91
  • Walgreen Co: $22.22
  • Exxon Mobil Corp: $89.32
  • 3M Co: $16.48
  • Archer-Daniels-Midland Co: $38.70
  • Johnson & Johnson: $83.60
  • Dover Corp: $10.55
  • Consolidated Edison Inc: $22.56
  • Kellogg Company: $56.26
  • RLI Corp: $26.51
  • Eaton Corporation: $69.24

Paisagem com arvoredo e figura” (Landscape with Grove and Figure) by Portuguese painter Alfredo Keil (1850-1907), assumed allowed under Fair Use.

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2017-01 Dividend Income Report

Here is the dividend income report for January, 2017.

The monthly dividend income came out to $218.88. The yearly income total for 2017 through the end of the month was $218.88.

The income for January, 2016 was $237.08, and the yearly income for 2016 through the end of January was $237.08.

The main reason the income went down is PNY was bought out. I bought LEG, but too late to get the dividend for January. My twelve-month moving average went down slightly for January. Since January is what David Fish calls an “A” month, the income tends to be smaller in January. Another reason the January income is low is because KO pulls its first dividend back and pays it in January, and pays the other three in the other “A” months.

As I stated, I bought LEG, but too late to get the payout for January. I guess I missed the ex-date, or the record date, or something. I don’t really know what exactly those dates mean. One comes before the other, and one of them makes you eligible to receive the dividend for the quarter. I think you have to buy the stock before whichever comes first. I don’t really know. Frankly, I don’t care. I have sold stocks in the past, and I will probably sell some more in the future, but the general plan is to hold on to the stocks I buy for years. Ideally for the rest of my life. Waiting an extra three months for the first payout will probably not make any difference about whether or not I eat cat food when I am old.

I have heard there are some people (or at least trading firms) will buy a stock and hold it just long enough to get the dividend, and then sell it before the payout and put the money into some other stock. I agree with Warren Buffett on this point: “If you aren’t willing to own a stock for ten years, don’t even think about owning it for ten minutes.” I guess you could make money by going in and out like that. You would have to take positions large enough to make more than your trading costs. But it just sounds like a lot of effort.

Here is a table with the year-to-date amounts, the monthly amounts, and the three- and twelve-month moving averages for each January from 2012 through 2017:

Month YTD Amount 3MMA 12MMA
2017-01 $218.88 $218.88 $584.54 $504.86
2016-01 $237.08 $237.08 $550.81 $457.97
2015-01 $213.49 $213.49 $471.54 $374.28
2014-01 $159.67 $159.67 $335.67 $287.98
2013-01 $110.12 $110.12 $348.07 $292.20
2012-01 $188.68 $188.68 $316.66 $256.77

 

Here are the stocks and the income amounts for January, 2017:

  • Automatic Data Processing: $34.69
  • MDU Resources Group Inc.: $11.57
  • Kimberly-Clark: $54.80
  • Illinois Tool Works: $36.63
  • Chubb Corp: $43.90
  • Sysco Corp: $19.66
  • RPM International Inc.: $17.63

Image  from Wikipedia, assumed allowed under Fair Use. Painting “View of Constantinople” (1856) by Russian-Armenian painter Ivan Aivazovsky (1817-1900).

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